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What artist should do before recording vocals

What artist should do before recording vocals

vocalist singing

As a vocalist, there are certain techniques one has to do to prepare the vocals for a performance. This is no different when you are about to record. Warm up exercises are necessary to relax the vocals before you sing. It will make a huge difference to not running out of breath and your ability to sing on key all the time. So hear a few basic things you can do before you record.

Breathing exercise

Start off with some basic breathing exercises. This will help you relax and prepare your vocals to sing high notes as well as help you with stamina while singing a song right through. Breathing exercises help you with power. If you know how to sing from your diaphragm you can get a lot of power out of your voice with the least amount of effort.

Scales (do re me fa so la ti do)

Scales help you with your pitch. Depending on the key of the song sing the scale to the root note or main key of the song you’re about to sing. This will help you sing on key every time and prepare your ears to listen out for any wrong notes. Also, harmony notes can be easily identified when warming up with scales.

Sing the song from start to finish

Once you are finished with scales sing the song right through as if it was your last performance, singing from your diaphragm. Practice managing your breathing as well as your pitch. Ensure that it is even, consistent and you’re comfortable doing it. Build on your performance as you practice the song. Once you’re done you should be ready to record.

Warm up exercises are good to do before recording vocals as it helps your voice to do the work.

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5 lessons learned from starting my own record label

5 lessons learned from starting my own record label

I registered my record label in August 2010, with the aim of releasing reggae and dancehall compilations. The name of the company was Remla Productions, and by December I was ready to put out my first record which was titled The Retirement Riddim. Since then, I have released over 7 compilations, 1 ep and a number of singles. The journey has been a wonderful learning experience and below I share 5 lessons I learned along the way.

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How a music producer can save time recording

How a music producer can save time recording

As a music producer how we spend our time is very important. It allows us to finish projects on time and get more things done. The recording is a huge part of what we do so I want to share with you a few ways to maximize recording time.

Always have rehearsals before you go in the studio.

It is very important that you rehearse your parts before you enter the studio. Whether you’re a musician or vocalist. A well-rehearsed part saves you time and allows you to focus more on getting the right performance for the song.

Plan ahead of time what you’re going to do

There is a saying if you fail to prepare you’re preparing to fail. Know ahead of time which songs you’re going to record and the number of songs you plan to do in that session. This will help the engineer prepare the sessions before you arrive at the studio. If you’re doing this in a home studio this will help you get started quickly.

Save templates for your sessions

If you record a lot, chances are you do the same things over and over with a few variation and experimentation. Instead of creating the same session from scratch. Why not save a template with all your effects and settings so you have a good starting point for your tracks. This can be eq settings and compression settings.

Be on time for your studio sessions

Punctuality goes a far way. When you arrive at the studio on time, well rehearsed you actually save a lot of time and can do more with your studio time. Plus it says a lot about who you are as an artist. When you’re on time you begin on time and finish early once you have done the work.

Have notes on what you want out of the track

It’s your song. You must have ideas on what you want to add to the track or a particular sound you want. Write these down and bring them with you to the studio. Share these ideas with your producer and collaborate. If you come to the studio blank then chances are you won’t get all your ideas out. Plus, you waste time on trying to do things on the fly.

This is a short list but should save you a lot of time when you’re working on your songs.

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How to get the most of your music producer

When you approach a music producer to produce your record, chances are you will leave everything up to the producer to decide and just take what he/she says and run with it. Wrong approach. Why do I say this? you’re a creative person and you need to know what you want. Know how you want your song to sound. You’re paying them to produce so ensure you get what you want. Here are a few tips on how to do this.

Know what a good mix and master sounds like

This is a big big thing. You need to train your ears to good mixes. Listen to everything and find stuff that is similar to what you do and use it as a reference point. Have a good listening environment so you can judge the mixes you get from your producer. It ensures you get quality work every time. Be your own quality control.

Know what you want and provide references

This is a big issue I always find when working with an artist. You do the track then they call you up and say I want it to sound like the new Avicii record for argument sake. The drums too low I want it more bass heavy. This goes on and on for the longest while. To minimize this have one or two reference tracks and give to your producer with instructions. Keep in mind you’re paying money to get this done. if your self-producing just keep it in mind of your goal for the song you’re working on. You’re not copying anything you’re just using it as a benchmark for your own ideas.

Allow the music producer to bring their ideas to the table

We all have different influences and we will interpret what you want differently. It can be good and it can be bad. All in all, collaborate to make the song better. Unique ideas different from your own can be strange at first but when you look at the bigger picture things can go smoothly when you respect other people’s opinions and ideas.

Be willing to put in the work required

Don’t just do things half-heartedly. Be prepared to do the work to get the song sounding right. Take the time to practice your vocals. Pay the musicians needed to play on the record. Be there when you’re needed to give your input. Respond the producers’ messages.

Know how to explain yourself

Lastly explain yourself as clearly as possible. Miscommunication can make or break the relationship you have with your producer. It is very important you say what you need clearly. If there are changes to be made to the mix, don’t say “the song is not mixed properly” say the bass is too loud, I can’t hear the vocals clearly. Be specific about the areas of the song you don’t like. This will, in turn, make the mix sound better and closer to what you originally wanted.

Hope this helps you get the most out of your producer. If you have any questions let me know in the comments section.

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How to record your first podcast

How to record your first podcast

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Recording your first podcast episode can be a daunting task. Your heart starts to beat fast, you start to sweat and self-doubt starts to kick in. Panic attacks before hitting the record button is common but no need to worry. In this step by step tutorial, you’ll learn how to record your first podcast.

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Podcast equipment for beginners

Podcast equipment for beginners

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If you’re thinking about starting a podcast, one the questions you might have is what equipment should I buy. With the array of choices, you might be confused and eventually delaying starting your podcast. No need to delay any longer because what you will need to get started is a few basic things, and they don’t need to be expensive.

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How to plan a podcast

How to plan a podcast

When planning a podcast they’re a few things you need to take into consideration. Before you decide to produce the actual series of episodes you will need a format for your podcast. In this article i will share with you tips on how to create the format for your new podcast.